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6.20      Boysenberries

6.20.1      Boysenberry industry profile

There are around 20 commercial boysenberry growers in New Zealand, with a total of 206 hectares planted. Total annual production is around 2,700 tonnes with 1,500 tonnes of frozen boysenberries being exported (of which around 480 tonnes is processed concentrate). Boysenberries are generally used as an ingredient in jams, ice cream, drinks, yoghurt, or preserves. Processed boysenberry products are also used by bakery and food service companies.

Interest in boysenberries has been increasing with the growing awareness of the health benefits from antioxidants and other phytochemicals found in purple berryfruit. Boysenberries remain a prescribed product under the Horticulture Export Authority Act, however in late 2013 they suspended their use of the licencing component of the structure, so export licenses are not required (refer HEA website). The industry group is the New Zealand Boysenberry Council (Manager – Ms Christine Kemp; phone (03) 547 5938). The Boysenberry Council represents the interests of growers, exporters and processors. Boysenberries are harvested from mid-December to mid-January.

 

6.20.2  Boysenberry exports

Boysenberries are a difficult product to handle fresh so are generally exported as block frozen fruit, IQF (Individually Quick Frozen) berries, puree, or concentrate. Total exports were valued at $3.4 million in 2018.

Exports of frozen boysenberry concentrate have remained around $1-2 million over the past three years. The top market destination profile has changed slightly with Kuwait remaining the leading destination. Exports to Australia increased by over 190% in 2017, before falling back down to just under $200,000 in 2018. Exports to Kuwait similarly doubled from 2016 to 2017, before falling 45%, resulting in an overall 19% increase from 2016.

Table 6.20.1: Frozen boysenberry concentrate (2009.89.20.25, 2009.89.30.35) export markets 2016-18 (year ending June, tonnes and $NZ FOB)

Market

2016

2017

2018

Volume

Value

Volume

Value

Volume

Value

Kuwait

17

501,332

38

1,096,230

22

595,465

European Union

16

413,134

18

439,449

17

474,661

Australia

9

240,908

28

705,320

5

174,913

Japan

15

137,390

4

87,443

3

97,316

United States of America

0

0

0

0

0

3,875

Total

56

$1,292,764

88

$2,328,442

47

$1,346,230

% change (yr/yr)

4.0%

-8.2%

56.7%

80.1%

-46.6%

-42.2%

Note that 8kgs of fruit convert into 1kg (0.001tonne) concentrate

Source: Statistics New Zealand

Exports of IQF boysenberries returned to their usual export levels of $550,000 - $650,000 after a significantly lower than normal year in 2016. Australia remains a key market for IQF boysenberries, with exports to Australia accounting for 97% of total value and volumes exported. IQF exports to the EU vary annually and none were sent in 2018. Exports to Taiwan have continued to decline since the 2014 report, where export values were around $0.5 million. There were no exports to Taiwan in 2018.

Table 6.20.2: Individual Quick Frozen boysenberry (0811.90.19.12) export markets 2016-18 (year ending June, tonnes and $NZ FOB)

Market

2016

2017

2018

Volume

Value

Volume

Value

Volume

Value

Australia

43

196,580

148

629,875

154

605,104

Japan

1

5,509

2

8,086

2

10,258

Thailand

1

5,129

2

7,911

0.5

3,486

Pacific Islands

1

5,492

1

3,372

1

2,502

Fiji

0.3

1,725

1

5,132

0.3

1,631

Mauritius

0

0

0.3

1,380

0.1

628

Singapore

0

0

0.2

1,055

0.1

352

Taiwan

5

38,977

1

8,396

0

0

European Union

4

16,436

0.3

1,317

0

0

Philippines

0

0

0.02

210

0

0

Myanmar

0.2

1,518

0

0

0

0

Vietnam

0.002

1

0

0

0

0

Total

55

$271,367

156

$666,734

158

$623,961

% change (yr/yr)

-63.4%

-56.3%

182.7%

145.7%

1.4%

-6.4%

Source: Statistics New Zealand

 

Trade in non-IQF frozen boysenberries has stabilised since 2016 but saw a significant jump in exports during 2017. Exports to the EU increased by 70% from 2016 to 2017, before falling 50% to end up 15% below their 2016 value. The effect of this decrease on overall exports was offset by a 70% increase in exports to Australia and 23% increase in exports to Norway, since 2016.

Table 6.20.3: Other boysenberry (0811.90.19.18) export markets 2016-18 (year ending June, tonnes and $NZ FOB)

Market

2016

2017

2018

Volume

Value

Volume

Value

Volume

Value

European Union

312

1,135,112

555

1,937,417

275

960,666

Australia

30

124,670

23

95,774

48

212,344

Norway

55

151,078

53

147,678

71

186,432

Thailand

1

6,554

2

15,947

3

30,995

Pacific Islands

0.5

2,489

0.3

1,455

3

6,136

Fiji

0.3

2,229

0.1

595

0.2

995

Singapore

0

0

0

0

0.2

960

Hong Kong

0

0

0

0

0

77

Mauritius

0

0

0.3

1,365

0

0

Myanmar

0.2

1,650

0

0

0

0

Total

399

$1,423,782

633

$2,200,231

402

$1,398,605

% change (yr/yr)

-29.4%

-27.2%

58.8%

54.5%

-36.5%

-36.4%

Source: Statistics New Zealand

 

A very small quantity (1 to 2 tonnes) of Frozen prepared and preserved boysenberries are exported each year. 2017 saw a large increase in exports to the Pacific Islands, but this ended in 2018, with export levels down about 19% on 2016.

Table 6.20.4: Frozen prepared / preserved boysenberry (2008.99.31.11) export markets 2016-18 (year ending June, tonnes and $NZ FOB)

Market

2016

2017

2018

Volume

Value

Volume

Value

Volume

Value

Australia

0.2

1,055

0.3

1,582

0.5

2,206

Pacific Islands

0.7

4,132

1.1

7,165

0.3

1,524

European Union

0.05

251

0.03

185

0.08

462

Fiji

0

0

0.4

1,124

0.04

217

Total

1.0

$5,438

1.9

$10,056

0.9

$4,409

% change (yr/yr)

-18.7%

-8.7%

96.5%

84.9%

-51.0%

-56.2%

Source: Statistics New Zealand

 

6.20.3  Barriers to boysenberry exports

Cost of tariffs

Tariffs in the European Union are high on all boysenberry products and may restrict growth of this market. Under the CPTPP, the 23% tariff into Japan on boysenberry concentrate will be phased to zero by 2023, while the 6% tariff on IQF will go to zero at entry into force on 30 December 2018. The $0.3 million estimated cost of tariffs in 2018 equates to an average $15,150 per boysenberry grower.